DENIS IAN SAID WHAT?…Mind Time

Denis Ian is a father, grandfather and education activist. He does not appear have his own blog, but I’ve read his piece on 4 different ones so far. And it’s a keeper.

Here are Denis’s thoughts about hurrying up, slowing down, the value of time and the expectations we have for children and ourselves with each passing year.

I’m already anxious about what to expect from Bubbe, Skootch and myself as we start to gear up for September. So thank you, Dennis for this beautiful math lesson.

Kindness Blog

I’m an old father now. Suddenly it seems.

My sons have sons. I own lots of memories. I polish the sweet ones and never dust the ones that hurt.

I mind time now. I didn’t used to. In fact, like lots of you, I was reckless with time. Not any longer.

When I was a boy of about 9 or so, I had the temporary misfortune of being the last to the dinner table … and that meant sitting just to the left of my father. That was like sitting next to the district attorney … or the pope. My brothers loved my dilemma … because that’s what brothers do. It’s in the Irish Manual of Life.

So … there I was … waiting for my moment of challenge. The knives were clanging plates and there were two or three different conversations happening around this table with the fat legs…

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BEND LIKE A BRANCH SAID WHAT?…It’s More About Cupcakes Than You Think

pinterest back to school cupcakes

I recently went back to one of my favorite places; the classroom. I’ve had the good fortune to teach children between the ages of two and twelve during my career. This time, my “students” are four years old. The way they play, interact, create, and think is marvelous and magical.

Spending my mornings with them reminded me of this essay which flashed across my Facebook feed some time ago.

If grown up expectations took a back seat and these young people were given a chance to slow down and enjoy the basics, I think we would all be better off in the long run.

Bend Like a Branch

A few weeks ago, while reading the comments on a story about our broken educational system, I came upon a response that basically said, well, all that parents care about are cupcakes and that’s the real problem. I suppose what was to be interpreted from that line is that parents aren’t really interested in the educating of their children because they are too interested in no longer being able to serve cupcakes at school parties, or ever actually. After all, cupcakes have nothing to do with a good education. Or do they?

My own history of my own education is a much different history than my children are creating. Growing up in the ’70’s and ’80’s my education was much more rounded. Not only could we freely have cupcakes, once a week our treat was a bottle of grape pop. We had recess and gym every single day. Not a…

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