I Said What?…What’s Cute Got To Do With It?

“To all the little girls watching…never doubt that you are valuable and powerful and deserving of every chance and opportunity in the world.” – HRC

During one of Bubbe’s sports clinics, I pulled out my writing notebook while Skootch was distracted by a fidget spinner. Two mothers, with their young daughters playing underfoot chatted nearby.

Mom 1 took out her phone.

Mom 2 leaned in. “Is that a picture of your babysitter? Wow. She’s cute. You don’t want to hire cute girls. They won’t be available to babysit on a Saturday night.”

I stopped mid-doodle and glared. Oh no she didn’t.

But she did. This woman, my peer, implied with conviction in front of her young daughter that the “cute” girl’s time, however she defined the adjective, was more valuable. A “cute” girl has more friends and a full social calendar. It is she who is considered successful and worthy. The less “cute” ones are not as good.

Skootch flicked at his spinner. “You okay, Mom?”

I lied. “Yes, sweetie. I’m fine.”

Growing up, I saw myself as the less cute and therefore less worthy girl in the photograph. Like many females, I was the recipient of direct and indirect messages equating physical appearance with societal and individual value.

The matriarchs in my family dipped their toes in feminist ideology. My mother was first in her family to pursue a college degree and worked throughout my childhood. My grandmother managed the household finances. But what overshadowed their progress, and what I remember more were the comments from adults about boys liking girls with long hair, quips highlighting my big bones and feet and being called belligerent whenever I voiced a passionate opinion.

A worthy woman was thin, pretty and pleasing; her role was to find a husband, care for him and raise his family. Anything beyond such convention made for trouble.

I was a trouble maker.

A women’s value being tied to and limited by her appearance as defined by tradition or opinion made zero sense from the outset. Still, it took me decades to apply the theory to myself. Even now, during the “this is who I am” phase of life, I will default to a negative personal narrative especially at first glance in a mirror or of a photograph.

The self-deprecation reflex feels unsettling because I know it’s wrong. It also reminds that the unhealthy messages and experiences we absorb as children leave a perpetual stain on one’s spirit. No matter how hard we scrub, they never fully disappear.

Today, countless organizations, authors, artists, public figures, communities and families are taking deliberate steps to reframe the conversation and encourage a generation of girls to equate worth and beauty with strength, curiosity, passion and personality.

The young ladies with whom I interact in my community are proof the shift is taking hold. There’s the middle schooler who competes as an Olympic weightlifter, the high school junior who uses food as fuel to build strength and endurance and the 18 year-old who responded, “It’s not about how I look, it’s about how I feel” after I told her she looked great.

Their sense of self is rooted in power, emotion and idea. Such wisdom at an early age will only nourish their confidence and embolden them to demand future employers, colleagues, friends and lovers to judge females based on human, not physical qualities.

Kudos to the mothers and fathers who are raising these women. And shame on those who didn’t get or care to read the Smart Girl  Like a Girl  Strong is the New Pretty memo.

While I can’t control what garbage spews from a random mom on a sideline, I can learn from inspirational young ladies and curtail personal comments rooted in insecurity. And I can use language around boys and girls that emphasize character over cute.

We adults have many things to be mindful of these days. Being careful not to perpetuate the “cute girl” cycle is no less significant.

Update: TODAY Parent’s Choice Award

As some of you know, Red said what? was a finalist for the TODAY Parent’s Choice Award. Thank you so much to those who took the time to vote. While I didn’t win, I feel lucky and humbled to be included on the ballot. If you like parenting reads, the winner was Mom Babble Blog. My favorite finalist was Tara Wood. Enjoy!

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5 thoughts on “I Said What?…What’s Cute Got To Do With It?

  1. A great post. I have daughters and granddaughters to continually work on this with.

    I reconnected with an older women yesterday from a swimming class that we’ve taken together in the past (I’m 60 and she’s in her late 70s or early 80s). She was asking me about my kids, my recent retirement from homeschooling, and how I currently occupy myself. As we talked, she said, “We have to keep in touch. I meet so few interesting women.”

    I’m glad she found me interesting, and I certainly enjoyed speaking with her. But, I was kind of shocked by her comment, especially since our swimming class is almost entirely made of women. Maybe it’s a generational thing. The women her age who make up most of the class were from a time and age when women mostly stayed home and took care of their children. I was a stay at home mom for most of the time I raised my 12 children, but as my youngest recently reminded me, I managed to keep up with several of my own passions at the same time. (Writing being at the top of that list.)

    It makes me glad that my parents raised me to do more than just “go with the flow.” As a highschooler in the 70’s I embraced the women’s lib movement. But as a young woman who married early and had children early, I somehow managed to maintain my sense of self, while still being a stay at home mom for so long. I am happy to be considered “an interesting woman” by those who are related to me, and those who I barely know!

    Like

  2. Yeah, there are a whole lot of hole-y spirits out there that need constant repair. Of course, the best remedy, as you say, is not to perpetuate the cycle. The more light shed upon this fact, the better chance for a strong, healthy, confident population. You’ve surely directed the spotlight on us today. Great advice, Jennifer, (and you’re first place in my book) !

    Like

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